Search This Blog

Loading...

29 April 2012

Sunday Obituary's: The famous Hanlon acrobats

A note to my Hanlon relatives reading this: I do not believe these Hanlons are related.

As I have searched and scoured the internet for information on my Hanlon ancestry, I have found endless articles on the Hanlon acrobats.  And in 1891 there was quite a series of articles about the death of one of the acrobats in Clinton, Iowa...he was  a Hanlon, he was not a Hanlon.  Then one last one that supposedly sets to rest the issue:  "He was a Hanlon, After All" from the Waterloo Daily Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, July 28th, 1891 (thanks to NewspaperArchive.com):

Waterloo Daily Courier | Waterloo, Iowa | Tuesday, July 28, 1891 | Page 4
 From wikipedia, we have a picture taken of the Hanlon brothers from 1867, photographer, unknown:


There was even a book written about these amazing Hanlons, "The Hanlon Brothers: From Daredevil Acrobatics to Spectacle Pantomime, 1833 - 1931":

This is a snippet from the book description on bibliovault.org:  "As young men, the Hanlons stunned audiences all over the world with their daring acrobatic feats. After a tragic accident severely injured one brother (and indirectly led to his suicide in a manner achievable only by someone with considerable acrobatic talents), they moved into the safer arena of spectacle pantomime, where they became the rage of Parisian popular theatre. They achieved fame with their uproariously funny and technically astonishing production of Le Voyage en Suisse. After settling permanently in the northeastern United States, they developed two more full-length pantomimes, Fantasma and Superba. The three shows toured for more than thirty years, a testament to their popularity and to the Hanlons’ impressive business acumen."

25 April 2012

Wedding Wednesday: Hanlon marriages in Iowa prior to 1900

As I mentioned in a previous post, I am stumped at researching my Hanlons:

"I am soooooooooo stuck on my Hanlon line.  John & his sister Margaret apparently just showed up one day in the 1850s from somewhere in Ireland.  I've even had a male cousin test his dna, I've done my own Family Finder dna test at FamilyTreeDNA.com....but alas, no answers!"

So, in addition to searching for obituaries of Hanlons prior to 1900, I thought, why not look for marriages as well?  Today I searched all the Iowa newspapers published by NewspaperArchive.com for my Hanlon family names of James, John, Thomas and Tom, Francis and Frank, Mary, Catherine, Margaret and Ellen.

Unfortunately, I could find no mention of any Hanlon getting married in IOWA in any of the Iowa newspapers prior to 1900, but did find this announcement of a Hanlon wedding from New York in the Palo Alto Reporter, Palo Alto, Iowa, September 6, 1900: 

"Wealthy Juveniles Elope

An elopement culminated in this city when Miss Frances Leo Hanlon of Lewistown and George H Hyde of Ridgeway were married by Rev. Father Leddy of St. Stephen's church.  The bride is a daughter of Patrick Hanlon, a prominent oil man of Elk county.  the bridegroom, George H Hyde, is the son of the late William Hyde of Ridgeway, a former state senator  and a successfulcoal and lumber deal.  Young Hyde is but 20 years old and is said to be worth about $500,000.  The bride is reputed to be worth $1,000,000."


23 April 2012

Mystery Monday: John Hanlon disappears from view 'as if engulfed by the earth'! 1896

Don't you miss the sensational headlines of old?   The headline in the Racine Journal, Racine, Wisconsin on Thursday April 30th, 1896 read:

A Mysterious Case

John Hanlon, a Grocery Clerk, Missing for a Week.

Disappeared from View as if Engulfed By the Earth

Police Make a Searching Investigation but Fail to Locate Him - Sequel to the Sudden Disappearance of J. McLaren.

Thank goodness they find John a week later with no reason ever given for his sudden disappearance.  Both articles are below. [to any relatives of mine reading this, this does not appear to be one of 'our' John Hanlons].

Thanks again to NewspaperArchive.com for the newspaper clippings.
Racine Journal | Racine, Wisconsin | Thursday, April 30, 1896 | Page 1
Racine Journal | Racine, Wisconsin | Thursday, May 07, 1896 | Page 9


22 April 2012

Black Sheep Sunday: James Hanlon 'the stabbed tramp'

Once again, just in case any blood relatives are reading this blog, this man is not related to us as far as I know!
This is from the Dubuque Daily Herald, Dubuque, Iowa, Thursday December 2, 1897 (from NewspaperArchive.com) :

The Stabbed Tramp

Will Be Tried for Burglary at Cassville and Robbery on a Train

"James Hanlon, the stabbed tramped picked up in Dubuque one Sunday morning several weeks ago, prove to be the man shot while attempting to rob a man in a box car between McGregor and La Crosse the previous Saturday."


Dubuque Daily Herald | Dubuque, Iowa | Thursday, December 02, 1897 | Page 1


Sunday's Obituary: Hanlons in Wisconsin prior to 1900

I am soooooooooo stuck on my Hanlon line.  John & his sister Margaret apparently just showed up one day in the 1850s from somewhere in Ireland.  I've even had a male cousin test his dna, I've done my own Family Finder dna test at FamilyTreeDNA.com....but alas, no answers!

So, why not just start searching for any obit for any Hanlon prior to 1900?  This is the start...I'll look for Hanlons with family names of John, James, Frank & Thomas as well as Mary, Catherine, Margaret and Ellen,  in Wisconsin in newspapers scanned by NewspaperArchive.com.  I've used the following words in the search to try and narrow down the results: "dead or death or killed or  obituary or  funeral or  dies or  died or  suicide or  murder or  called" .

"Numbered with the Dead.  Mrs. John Hanlon died yesterday morning of 3:15 o'clock at her home, 255 South Franklin street, after an illness of four months' duration.  Her death was the result of stomach trouble and through her long illness she bore her suffering patiently.  Deceased was about twenty-three years of age.  Besides a heart broken husband, she leaves a father, J. O. Maloney, a step mother, four brothers and four sisters, all of whom reside near Edgerton..."
Daily Gazette, The | Janesville, Wisconsin | Monday, June 06, 1898 | Page 1

18 April 2012

Wedding Wednesday: Hanlon marriages in Wisconsin prior to 1900

As I mentioned in a previous post, I am stumped at researching my Hanlons:

"I am soooooooooo stuck on my Hanlon line.  John & his sister Margaret apparently just showed up one day in the 1850s from somewhere in Ireland.  I've even had a male cousin test his dna, I've done my own Family Finder dna test at FamilyTreeDNA.com....but alas, no answers!"

So, in addition to searching for obituaries of Hanlons prior to 1900, I thought, why not look for marriages as well?  Today I searched all the Wisconsin newspapers published by NewspaperArchive.com for my Hanlon family names of James, John, Thomas and Tom, Francis and Frank, Mary, Catherine, Margaret and Ellen. Only one showed up in the search results:

This announcement was found in thecolumn titled "Emerald Grove Gossip":
"On March 1, [1892], Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hanlon gave a reception in honor of the marriage of their daughter, Mary, to Daniel Keegan.  It was largely attended.  Mr. and Mrs. Keegan will make their home near this village."

Janesville Gazette | Janesville, Wisconsin |
Wednesday, March 09, 1892 | Page 4


The actual wedding announcement was in the paper the prior week:  "Daniel Keegan, of Union, and Miss Mary Hanlon, of Emerald Grove, were married this morning, the ceremony being performed by Dean McGinnity at 7:30 o'clock, at St. Patrick's church..."


Janesville Gazette | Janesville, Wisconsin | Tuesday, March 01, 1892 | Page 4



16 April 2012

As I mentioned in a previous post, I am stumped at researching my Hanlons:

"I am soooooooooo stuck on my Hanlon line.  John & his sister Margaret apparently just showed up one day in the 1850s from somewhere in Ireland.  I've even had a male cousin test his dna, I've done my own Family Finder dna test at FamilyTreeDNA.com....but alas, no answers!"

So, in addition to searching for obituaries & marriages of Hanlons prior to 1900, I thought, why not look for all the military records as well? 

This is going to be a little more difficult, I fear.  I will be using Fold3.com and look for records.  I believe my Hanlons were still in Ireland during the Revolutionary War.  I will acknowledge that some Irish did come and fight, and return to Ireland.  So I may re-visit whether to search for them in the Revolutionary War records.

Today, I will look at Civil War records...

First I searched for John Hanlon.  My great-grandfather, John Hanlon left Wisconsin for Illinois sometime in the 1860s.  I do not have written records proving where he might have lived before his removal to Stone City,  Iowa in 1870 to join other family members.  There is no indication on his gravestone in Dallas County, Iowa that he was a Civil War Veteran, but thought I should look anyway. 

I found these two John Hanlons from Illinois:

There is a John Hanlon from Gallatin County, Illinois who was taken prisoner by the Union in 1862.  His record is found in the "Union Provost Marshals' File of Paper Relating to Individual Civilians".  According to Fold3.com, "These documents relate to civilians, or "citizens” as they were called during the Civil War, who came in contact with the Army. They include correspondence, provost court papers, orders, passes, paroles, oaths of allegiance, transportation permits, and claims for compensation for property used or destroyed by military forces."

In his papers, John implores that he was arrested by mistake, that he is innocent of any charges, and that in fact, he has not been made aware of the charges for which he is being held.  His appeal is heard and he is released.

There is also a John T Hanlon, part of Company I, 59th Regiment of the Illinois Infantry.  His card lists him as an invalid.  It is part of the group of records:  Civil War and Later Veterans Pension Index.  The application was filed April 15th 1873.  I tried to find John T Hanlon on FindAGrave.com in Illinois, but was not successful.

There were no Civil War records for a James, Thomas, Tom, Jno, Jim, Tom, Francis or Frank Hanlon in Illinois.

While doing a google search for Civil War Records for Hanlons I also came across this web site, which apparently has not been updated for years, but still contains great info.  The site states : 

"Note: Many soldiers were not well educated so others filled out the forms for them. Different people might spell a name different ways, so many soldiers appear with mis-spelt names, and some even appear with more than one spelling! Although the men are listed below by surname, it could be argued that these are all so similar that one should consider them all as equal, i.e. look for a particular first name, regardless of the spelling of the surname.

The muster rolls of the American Civil War (1861 to 1865) show many Hanlons, Hanlins and Handlins - on both the Union and the Confederate sides. The soldiers listed below were extracted from the National Park Service's excellent website of Civil War Soldiers and Sailors. (As stated on the CWSS website, these records are public domain and may be freely reproduced.) Please consult the CWSS website for additional information, and microfilm reference numbers for further research."

Madness Monday: Insanity a quick 'answer' for the unknown

In the April 6th, 1883 Perry Chief, from Perry, Dallas County, Iowa, two death notices stood out, only because they so casually dismissed the deaths as the acts of  'insane' people.

Perry Chief, The | Perry, Iowa | Friday, April 06, 1883 | Page 6

"William Jepson, aged 53, cut his throat a few days ago at Ashton and died in a few hours.  No cause is known, but he is believed to have been insane.  He was unmarried."
and
"Mrs. Jessie Balcombe, wife of a respectable farmer near Creston, committed suicide March 26th, by hanging herself in the cellar.  She is supposed to have been insane."


15 April 2012

Surname Saturday: Daniel O'Connell the Liberator

As a child I was told, as I'm sure anyone with the name of O'Connell in their lineage, that we were descended from Daniel O'Connell.  I have not been able to prove this but I did run across an article about Daniel O'Connell's sons:

Chilton Times | Chilton, Wisconsin | Thursday, July 01, 1858 | Page 2
 This was published in 1858 in the Chilton Times, Chilton, Wisconsin (thanks to NewspaperArchive.com for the clipping) :
"Daniel O'Connell, the Liberator, has but two surviving sons left, Morgan, formerly member for Meath and Daniel, the youngest, who sits for the borough of Tralee.  Some twenty years ago, or more, Mr. O'Connell, then in the zenith of his fame used to boast that there were 'eight of us' a very forcible hint to the Minister of that day.  In 1858 but two of that formidable phalanx are surviving, and only one of the name of O'Connell is to be found on the rolls of Parliament.  John, the favorite son of 'the Liberator' died in very straightened circumstances, and has left a large and youthful family almost wholly unprovided for."

Sunday's Obituary: Hanlon Obituaries in Illinois before 1900

I am soooooooooo stuck on my Hanlon line.  John & his sister Margaret apparently just showed up one day in the 1850s from somewhere in Ireland.  I've even had a male cousin test his dna, I've done my own Family Finder dna test at FamilyTreeDNA.com....but alas, no answers!

So, why not just start searching for any obit for any Hanlon prior to 1900?  This is the start...I'll look for Hanlons with family names of John, James, Frank & Thomas in Illinois in newspapers scanned by NewspaperArchive.com.  I've used the following words in the search to try and narrow down the results: "dead or death or killed or  obituary or  funeral or  dies or  died or  suicide or  murde or  called" . 


 
Oak Park Lake Vindicator | Oak Park, Illinois |
 Saturday, January 10, 1885 | Page 4


"An infant son of Dennis and Hannah Hanlon, aged 1 year and 3 months, died at their residence, Duncan Park and Wallace street, on Saturday last."


_______________________________________________


Alton Evening Telegraph | Alton, Illinois |
Tuesday, August 15, 1899 | Page 3
 "Sudden Death of John Hanlon

About 11:30 o'clock to-day as four workmen were engaged in getting out rock from the quarry near the stone crusher, a large fragment of rock fell unexpectedly and Mr. John Hanlon, one of the number, was caught by the falling mass and instantly crushed to death, the weight falling principally on his breast."











 
______________________________________________
"Mrs. Ellen Connors, formerly of Alton, sister of Mrs. John Hanlon, and aunt of Mrs. Ralph Dixon and James, John and Ned Hanlon of this city, died at her home in East St. Louis, Thursday."

Alton Evening Telegraph | Alton, Illinois |
Monday, December 31, 1900 | Page 3


11 April 2012

Wedding Wednesday: Hanlons in Illinois prior to 1900

As I mentioned in a previous post, I am stumped at researching my Hanlons:

"I am soooooooooo stuck on my Hanlon line.  John & his sister Margaret apparently just showed up one day in the 1850s from somewhere in Ireland.  I've even had a male cousin test his dna, I've done my own Family Finder dna test at FamilyTreeDNA.com....but alas, no answers!"

So, in addition to searching for obituaries of Hanlons prior to 1900, I thought, why not look for marriages as well?  Today I searched all the Illinois newspapers published by NewspaperArchive.com for my Hanlon family names of James, John, Thomas and Tom, Francis and Frank, Mary, Catherine, Margaret and Ellen. Only one showed up in the search results:


Alton Evening Telegraph | Alton, Illinois |
Tuesday, August 15, 1899 | Page 3

"The marriage of James Hanlon to Miss Julia Long took place in the Cathedral this morning at 5:30 o'clock, Rev. Fr. Cusack performed the ceremondy and officiated at the nuptial mass.  There was a alarge attendance of relatives and friends of the young couple at the marriage ceremony.... "


08 April 2012

Black Sheep Sunday: "Doc Adams Has His Up and Downs" 1909

Perry Daily Chief, The | Perry, Iowa | Thursday, February 11, 1909 | Page 1
This is a humorous Black Sheep article.  While perusing Perry, Iowa newspapers I noticed this story about "one of the strongest plungers" in the country.  I don't think they mean he is a plumber, either!

The story regales the misadventures of  "Doc Adams"; son of well known Dr. John W. Adams from Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa.  The young son had a 'overwhelming passion for gambling'.  The article ends with Doc Adams hoping to regain his lost fortune in Canada.

I wonder whatever happened to him?

Sunday's Obituary: Mrs. Ross E. Boyd [January 1920]

Perry Daily Chief, The | Perry, Iowa | 
Wednesday, January 07, 1920 | Page 1
Another obituary of a woman who's identity was only her husband's name:

"Many Attend the Funeral Services"
"The funeral services of Mrs. Ross E. Boyd, whose death Monday evening brought such a shock to her many Perry friends, were held this afternoon at 2:30 at the Methodist church, and were conducted by the pastor, Rev. A. T. Bishop.  There was a large attendance of friends at the services, all of them anxious to show by their presence, their beautiful floral tokens and their words of sympathy, the esteem in which they held the young woman and the sorrow they felt because of her death."


I did find a memorial at FindAGrave.com for an Ellen M. Boyd, buried at Violet Hill Cemetery, Perry, Dallas County, Iowa.  No indication is given as to her maiden name, however.

Newspaper article clipping thanks to NewspaperArchive.com, one of my most favorite genealogical tools!

04 April 2012

Wedding Wednesday: This guy LOVED being married! 1904

Today it is not unusual to hear stories of men who are commitment-phobic.  This story from 1904 shows one man who just loved being married so much he did it multiple times without the benefit of divorce!
Perry Daily Chief, The | Perry, Iowa | 
Wednesday, January 06, 1904 | Page 7

"Bigamy is the charge made against Samuel C. Hazzard, alias, Samuel Hargrave, a former officer of the United States Navy, who has been arrested in this city.


Coupled with the name of Hazzard or Hargrave, as he is known, in local insurance circles, is that of Dr. Linda Burfield and Viva Hazzard, nee Fitchpatrick, daughter of State Senator Fitchpatrick of Nevada, Iowa."


Newspaper clipping from NewspaperArchive.com


02 April 2012

Madness Monday: Murder trial source of much family tree info

Perry Daily Chief, The | Perry, Iowa | 
Wednesday, January 30, 1895 | Page 1
This family is not part of my tree, but I was amazed at the amount of family relationship detail provided in this account of a trial in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1895.  The defendant didn't have a chance with all the members of his family deemed 'insane':

"The defense expects to prove that John H Keller, the maternal grand uncle of the defendant, was confined in the Jacksonville asylum at intervals between 1840 and his death at the age of 72, in 1882, and that George K Van meter, a first cousin of the defendant, became violently insane in 1843, was confined in the asylum, escaped and was never heard from again.  ...the defense expects to prove also that Zillah Van Meter Keller, the maternal great grandmother of the defendant was three times insane and had suicidal tendencies; that Moses Van Meter, an uncle of the maternal great grandmother of the defendant, was violently insane all his life."

Wow, three times insane!  What a gold mine for family information, if you still would want to claim them as your family, that is!

Again, thanks to NewspaperArchive.com for the great news article!

01 April 2012

Sunday's Obituary: Hanlon in Iowa prior to 1900

As I have mentioned previously: 
"I am soooooooooo stuck on my Hanlon line.  John & his sister Margaret apparently just showed up one day in the 1850s from somewhere in Ireland.  I've even had a male cousin test his dna, I've done my own Family Finder dna test at FamilyTreeDNA.com....but alas, no answers!

So, why not just start searching for any obit for any Hanlon prior to 1900?  This is the start...I'll look for Hanlons with family names of John, James, Frank & Thomas as well as Mary, Catherine, Margaret and Ellen,  in Iowa in newspapers scanned by NewspaperArchive.com.  I've used the following words in the search to try and narrow down the results: "dead or death or killed or  obituary or  funeral or  dies or  died or  suicide or  murder or  called" ."


Cedar Rapids Evening Gazette | Cedar Rapids, Iowa | Saturday, January 03, 1891 | Page 1

"John Hanlon, a lineman of St. Louis, grasped a live wire yesterday and was so badly shocked that he fell to the ground and was killed."
I did a search on FindAGrave.com and did find a record of a John Hanlon, age 35, who died in January, 1891.  He is buried in Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum, Saint Louis, Missouri.

For this next one, apparently they were in a rush to meet a deadline for the paper as we do not know if he was fatally stabbed:


Waterloo Daily Courier | Waterloo, Iowa | Monday, March 09, 1891 | Page 2
 "John Hanlon, recently of St. Paul, was severely and perhaps fatally stabbed while walkng on the railroad track near West Duluth, by an unknown man."

The next death notice does not indicate where this Hanlon resided:
"Thomas Hanlon, 40 years of age, once a wealthy and influential broker, but recently an employee of the cashier's office of the Mutual Life Insurance Company, committed suicide at his home by shooting himself in the head and left breast."  I searched for a Thomas Hanlon on findagrave.com with a death date in 1894, but did not see anything.

Rolfe Reveille | Rolfe, Iowa | Thursday, August 09, 1894 | Page 7

This notice does not list a first name.  I have searched findagrave.com and IowaGravestones.org but cannot find a Hanlon who died in this time frame:

Sioux County Herald | Orange City, Iowa | Thursday, December 04, 1890 | Page 2


Sunday’s Obituary: Mrs. Allen Wright [nee Ballard]

Bulletin, The | Perry, Iowa | 
Thursday, August 13, 1914 | Page 1
So many women's identites were lost in obituaries in the early 1900s.  Hopefully this will bring some recognition to what apparently was a short life: "Body of Young Matron brought from St. Paul This Morning - Services at Ballard Home".

The burial was at Violet Hill Cemetery in Perry, Dallas County, Iowa.
The obituary is a clip from The Bulletin, Perry, Iowa, Thursday, August 13, 1914, with recognition to NewspaperArchive.com.

"The funeral of Mrs. Allen Wright, whose death occurred at her home in St. Paul early Monday morning, will be held at the residence of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Ballard, on North Second street tomorrow afternoonat 3:30.  The services will be conducted by Rev. J. M. Williams, pastor of the First Methodist church, and interment will be made at Violet Hill Cemetery."

Black Sheep Sunday: "Kills Bride of Three Months"; Fulton, Missouri

Perry Daily Chief, The | Perry, Iowa | Friday, September 23, 1921 | Page 1
Today I have been going through old Perry, Iowa newspapers from the early 1900s.  I came across a small article of a man who killed his father, then later, killed his wife and himself; the story's dateline was Fulton, Missouri.     There was no FindAGrave.com memorial to his family, and it pains me to see victims forgotten.  This particular "black sheep" is not in my family tree.

May the family rest in peace.

"Earnest Sission, 27, last night show and killed his bride of three months, Susan Sission, 22.   The shooting took place as the result of a quarrel, according to the report of neighbors.  Sission then turned the gun on himself.  He died about an hour later.  His bride was show three times in the abdomen and once in the head.  Sission shot and killed his father in 1917 at Bowling Green, Missouri, and was recently discharged from the State Hospital after an observation term, according to authorities."